Available technologies

Licensing Cambridge innovation

Cambridge Enterprise works in collaboration with University of Cambridge researchers to market and license available technologies ranging from the biosciences to engineering.

We have completed more than 1,000 commercial agreements.

We welcome contact from companies interested in licensing available technologies from the University of Cambridge, and work with companies on an individual basis to identify specific areas of interest.

Image: The chromosome screening technology developed by University of Cambridge spin-out BlueGnome has shown to increase in vitro fertilisation (IVF) success rates by 65% over the current methods.

360° 3D Light-field Display

Physical Sciences Ref No: Yon-3520-17
Read more

Dr Ӧzgür Yöntem and his team in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Cambridge have invented a novel 360° 3D light-field capturing and display system. The display has potential applications in novel gaming experiences, enhanced reality, novel interactive museum experiences, videoconferencing, and autonomous vehicle infotainment.

Key benefits:

  • Display can be viewed by many people from many angles
  • 3D and appears to “pop” out of the surface
  • Compatible with haptic feedback systems
  • Can be used in both capture and display modes
  • Intrinsic capturing property allows real-time hand/eye tracking

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for 360° 3D Light-field Display

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Method for reducing rendering time and transmission bandwidth for next-generation VR

Physical Sciences Ref No: Man-3441-18
Read more

The advent of wireless VR is pushing the limits of rendering quality and framerate over a more limited cordless connection. By optimising the frame delivery method and rendering time using Temporal Resolution Multiplexing (TRM), VR component manufacturers can bridge the gap between quality and transmission rates required for a truly wireless virtual experience.

By studying the human visual system and its limitations, Dr Rafal Mantiuk and Gyorgy Denes from the Department of Computer Science, University of Cambridge have developed an optimised VR rendering process that minimises rendering time and transmission bandwidth whilst maintaining high visual quality.

 

Benefits

  • Savings on computation, transmission and rendering
  • Blur reduction
  • Improved smoothness of motion
  • Unlocks limits on wireless VR

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Method for reducing rendering time and transmission bandwidth for next-generation VR

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Highly scattering white cellulose material

Physical Sciences Ref No: Vig-3383-16
Read more

Dr Silvia Vignolini and her team in the Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge and her collaborators at the University of Aalto, have developed a process for producing bright white (highly scattering) films with nano-fibrillated cellulose. This is expected to enable a new generation of pigment-free, biodegradable, white material as a potential replacement for titanium dioxide and zinc oxide.

 

Key Benefits

  • The material is biodegradable, ideal for food colouring and cosmetics
  • Potential replacement for titanium dioxide, which is being phased out
  • Fabricated from a readily available natural material, highly suitable for upscaling
  • Completely opaque at tens of microns thick

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Highly scattering white cellulose material

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Triboelectric energy harvesting using self-poled Nylon-11 nanowires

Physical Sciences Ref No: Kar-3513-17
Read more

Triboelectric generators are based on the static electric charge created when two dissimilar materials come into contact, and can be used to harvest energy from mechanical vibrations.  Researchers at the Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy have developed a triboelectric generator using self-poled Nylon-11 nanowires. The triboelectric generator provides more efficient energy harvesting than other energy harvesting systems, while matching the power output required by many sensors and devices for wireless sensor networks and wearable electronics.

 

The key benefits of this technology include:

  • A triboelectric generator that can harvest enough energy from ambient mechanical vibrations to power low-power electronic devices
  • Replacement for batteries in applications such as wireless networks and wearable electronics
  • Power output of around 1W/m2 – a ten-fold increase compared to standard triboelectric generators
  • Harvests energy from a wide range of vibrational frequencies (0-10Hz or more)

 

The team is now keen to collaborate with partners to develop applications for this technology.

 

Download more information

 

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Triboelectric energy harvesting using self-poled Nylon-11 nanowires

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Enabling smart textiles with fabric-friendly graphene-based inks

Physical Sciences Ref No: Tor-3208-15
Read more

The use of inks incorporating graphene and other 2D materials has been suggested as a way to improve the existing limited approaches to wearable electronics. Poor adhesion of graphene ink to fabric substrates has so far restricted the performance and durability that could be achieved.

Researchers in the Department of Engineering have developed techniques to modify and prepare the substrates, enabling better quality deposition of inks made from graphene and related materials, and resulting in better connectivity and higher performance of the final component. A spin-out company Textile Two Dimensional Ltd is now further improving the technology and is looking for commercial partners interested in adding functionality to their textile product.

In such a new and growing area, the possible applications are extremely varied, but may include

  • fashion (conductive interconnects)
  • functional garments
  • high performance sportswear
  • personal health technology
  • wearable technology / computing
  • automotive (heating elements, sensors)
  • protection (flame retardancy, waterproofing)

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Enabling smart textiles with fabric-friendly graphene-based inks

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Conductive binder for energy storage devices

Physical Sciences Ref No: Gal-3100-14
Read more

Researchers in the Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, have developed a new material for energy storage device electrodes using activated carbon and reduced graphene oxide. The team is now keen to license the technology to a suitable partner for development. Possible applications include automotive industry and hybrid vehicles, smartphones, and energy harvesting.

Key benefits include

  • 25-30% improvement in specific capacitance
  • Up to 400% improvement in power density and discharge rate
  • Low cost, standard production processes and solvents

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Conductive binder for energy storage devices

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Anaerobic Epoxidation of Ethylene

Physical Sciences Ref No: Mar-3508-17
Read more

Researchers in the Department of Engineering and the Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, have developed a new catalyst and process for the generation of ethylene oxide from ethene which removes the need for purified air, showing a potential new route to more efficient and safer ethylene oxide production. The team is now keen to find suitable partners for upscaling and development.

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Anaerobic Epoxidation of Ethylene

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

High capacitance, low cost, mechanically robust and flexible supercapacitor active material

Physical Sciences Ref No: Smo-3466-17
Read more

Researchers at the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge have developed a new polymeric network material that enables the production of a flexible supercapacitor with high specific capacitance and cycling stability. Possible applications include supercapacitors for wearable and biomedical applications, and soft robotics. The team is now keen to collaborate with suitable partners for the development of the technology.

Key Benefits:

  • High specific capacitance – 182 F/g achieved using PEDOT/PEO polymer network combination
  • High cycling stability – capacitance retained over 3,000 charging cycles at high charge rates, due to the intrinsic mechanical stability of the material
  • Highly flexible and biocompatible – material suitable for wearable and biomedical applications, performance retained over 1,000 bending cycles
  • Wide potential window – working voltage 0 – 2.7 V has been experimentally confirmed for the supercapacitor device based on our active materials
  • Low-cost – uses mature, scalable manufacturing methods (compatible with printing technologies), with cheaply and readily available raw input materials

Download more information

 

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for High capacitance, low cost, mechanically robust and flexible supercapacitor active material

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Fast Liquid Crystal on Silicon Phase Modulator

Physical Sciences Ref No: Yip-3376-16
Read more

Researchers in the Department of Engineering have developed a new type of high speed phase modulator based on Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) technology. This is expected to enable faster optical switches for telecoms applications, higher quality holographic displays and enhanced live cell microscopy.

 

Key benefits include:

  • Very fast, with around 40 µs switching time
  • 256 greyscale and very good switching depth
  • Polymer free, no grating structure
  • Works with off the shelf liquid crystal, and may be optimised using a proprietary liquid crystal mixtureThe team is now keen to collaborate with suitable partners for development of the technology.

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Fast Liquid Crystal on Silicon Phase Modulator

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Scalable process for manufacturing high-resolution, stretchable electronics

Physical Sciences Ref No: Tan-3350-16
Read more

It is challenging to fabricate electrodes on soft and stretchable substrates such as polymers and elastomers using existing techniques developed for silicon, glass or foil substrates (on which electrodes are more commonly fabricated). This is due to the significantly different chemical and physical properties between these substrates.

These differences generally result in: higher densities of defects, including cracks in the substrate and/or in the electrodes; limited resolutions when using conventional electrode patterning methods; poor adhesion of electrode materials to the substrate; and low surface areas of the electrodes, which can be particularly problematic in the context of biosensors and other wearable or implantable bio-electronic devices.

Researchers at the Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Large-Area Electronics (CIMLAE), University of Cambridge have developed and patented a manufacturing process which address these issues and have produced highly stretchable, high-resolution electronic devices. They are now looking for opportunities to commercially develop and license their technology.

Key Benefits:

  • Intrinsically scalable manufacturing methods
  • Chemical compatibility with common polymers and elastomers
  • Process can be tuned to desired level of stretchability – up to 20% (for total extension of 120%) achieved
  • High-resolution fabrication enabling small, high-sensitivity sensors (down to 50nm features)

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Scalable process for manufacturing high-resolution, stretchable electronics

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Sharp graphite tips for nanotechnology applications

Physical Sciences Ref No: Fer-3435-17; OM-0406
Read more

Sharp graphite tips have been developed in the lab of Dr Amalio Fernandez-Pacheco at the University of Cambridge using a three-step polishing method. The final diameter of the tips is less than 5 microns, and can be shaped to sub-100 nm sizes and special geometries if the application requires it. These sharp tips have potential uses in various nanotechnology applications such as:

1) Tomographic holders

2) Probes for micromanipulation

3) Semiconducting probes for electrical measurements

4) Probes in organic systems to study their elastic properties

Please contact us if you would like to discuss further.

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Sharp graphite tips for nanotechnology applications

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Highly tough and stretchable conducting polymer networks

Physical Sciences Ref No: Sch-3259-16
Read more

Professor Oren A. Scherman and his team in the Melville Laboratory for Polymer Synthesis, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, have developed a new highly tough and stretchable polymer hydrogel material capable of self healing and exhibiting ionic conductivity, with unique flexibility in its molecular design. This could potentially enable a new generation of flexible electronics and innovative materials for biomedical applications.

 

In such a new and growing area, the possible applications are extremely varied, but may include:

·         Smart materials for wearable technology

·         New generations of medical devices such as insulin pumps

·         Wearable biosensors for recreational and medical applications

·         Biomedical implants such as artificial cartilage and skin

The team is now keen to discuss the potential for this material with interested commercial parties.

 

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Highly tough and stretchable conducting polymer networks

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Energy-efficient butanol fermentation separation method

Physical Sciences Ref No: Hod-3387-16
Read more

Butanol is commercially interesting as a direct gasoline replacement and substitute because it overcomes many of the limitations of the current gasoline substitutes, such as ethanol, due to its immiscibility with water and similar energy density to gasoline. Like ethanol, there is much commercial interest in producing butanol from fermentation of biomass, either directly or via crude syngas production. However, the recovery of butanol from the fermentation broth using classical techniques such as distillation is very energy intensive.

Researchers in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology have devised a method of separating butanol from fermentation broths that provides an energy reduction of over 90% compared to conventional distillation technologies. Based on the research to date, it looks like this energy-efficient method has the potential to be implemented as part of the retrofitting process to modify existing ethanol fermentation plants for butanol production.

The technology is protected by a UK priority patent application and we’re now looking for partners to help us develop the technology. Please contact us if you’d like to discuss further.

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Energy-efficient butanol fermentation separation method

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Structurally coloured cellulose microparticles

Physical Sciences Ref No: Vig-3336-16
Read more

Structural colouration is responsible for many brilliant iridescent colours found in plants.  Dr Silvia Vignolini and her team in the Department of Chemistry have developed a process for producing nanocrystalline cellulose microparticles with structural colour. This is expected to enable a new generation of pigment-free, biodegradable, natural coloured products.

Download more information

 

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Structurally coloured cellulose microparticles

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Solid state organic materials for barocaloric cooling

Physical Sciences Ref No: Moy-3305-16
Read more

Typical commercially available cooling equipment such as refrigerators or air conditioning systems use liquid-vapour-phase (LVP) cycles to achieve the temperature reduction. However such devices are known to suffer from environmental issues including noise and the risk of leakage of volatile hydrocarbons.

Solid state refrigerants have been explored for many years but have not managed to achieve comparable performance to the currently available systems. Researchers at the Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy at the University of Cambridge, together with colleagues at the Universitat de Barcelona and the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, have now identified a new class of solid state compounds which can provide similar cooling under equivalent pressure changes to those used in conventional LVP cycles, while operating around room temperature and using inexpensive raw materials.

The technology is protected by a PCT patent application and we’re now looking for partners to help us explore the different areas where this might be useful. Please contact us if you’d like to discuss further.

Download for more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Solid state organic materials for barocaloric cooling

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

A universal formulation strategy for functional inks

Physical Sciences Ref No: Has-3167-15
Read more

A new method for formulating functional inks incorporating a wide range of commercially available nano platelets or nano particles has been demonstrated.

This enables the production of low cost, environmentally friendly, room temperature processable inks, ink additives and composites based on materials such as graphene, MoS2 or h-BN, which in turn can be tailored to achieve enhanced electrical, thermal or physical properties according to the material and application.

Potential applications include:

  • Conductive inks, plastics and adhesives
  • High strength coatings
  • Dielectric or semiconducting inks
  • Thermally conductive composites

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for A universal formulation strategy for functional inks

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

GreenSwirl software for calculating Green’s function for swirling flow in an infinite duct

Physical Sciences Ref No: Mat-3234-15
Read more

GreenSwirl is a MATLAB program for calculating Green’s function for swirling flow in an infinite duct. The duct can have either hard walls or an acoustic lining, modeled using the Ingard-Myers boundary condition. The mean flow is a function of only radial position, can have shear and swirling components, and can be input as functions or data points. The programme calculates eigenmodes and the Green’s function of the linearised Euler equations. The programme calculates these either numerically (Basic version) or numerically and analytically assuming the frequency is large (Advanced version). GreenSwirl has applications to the beamforming technique and can be used in the aeroacoustics industry to model aeroengine noise.

Further information can be found at the GreenSwirl website and in the following publications:

Mathews, J., Peake, N. and Bianchi, S. (May 2016). Asymptotic and numerical Green’s function in a lined duct with realistic shear and swirl. 22nd AIAA/CEAS Conference Paper (Lyon).

Mathews, J., and Peake. N., Journal of Sound and Vibration, Journal of Sound and Vibration, 2017, 395, 294-316.

Licences to the software for both academic and commercial users are available for purchase by contacting us at the link below.

Image result for aircraft pictures

 

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for GreenSwirl software for calculating Green’s function for swirling flow in an infinite duct

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Q3PULSE software for predicting unsteady turbocharger turbine performance

Physical Sciences Ref No: Cao-3214-15
Read more

The Q3PULSE software is used for predicting unsteady turbocharger turbine performance, particularly under pulsating flow conditions. It builds a low order model of a turbine which combines a quasi-3D model for a volute and multiple meanline models for a rotor. This model strikes a good balance between accuracy and complexity. It provides a quick, robust and accurate prediction of unsteady turbine performance under pulsating flows. It is therefore a good research and design tool which allows turbine designers to accommodate the pulsating flow effect into the preliminary turbine design.

The software is compatible with Linux and Windows. Academic and commercial licensing is available; please get in contact for more information.

Q3PULSE Fig1          Q3PULSE Fig2

Publications:

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 2016, 138(7), 072607.

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Q3PULSE software for predicting unsteady turbocharger turbine performance

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Highly Rechargeable and Efficient Lithium-Air Battery

Physical Sciences Ref No: Gre-3148-15
Read more

Professor Clare Grey and her team at the Department of Chemistry have developed a novel technology for aprotic Lithium-Air (Li-Air) batteries. This ground-breaking technology uses a spongy graphene cathode and new chemistry based on the formation of LiOH. The resulting battery exhibits extremely low over-potential (<0.2 V), leading to efficiency greater than 90% and fewer side-reactions. The battery can be charged and recharged for more than 1000 cycles. The battery is also stable with respect to moisture.

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Highly Rechargeable and Efficient Lithium-Air Battery

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Protein microcapsules

Physical Sciences Ref No: Kno-2950-13
Read more

A method of forming nanofibrillar protein microcapsules has been developed at the University of Cambridge. Encapsulation technologies can be used as delivery systems for a variety of applications in beauty, personal care, food and healthcare. Encapsulation provides a means of targeting delivery, protecting unstable actives from degradation, formulating incompatible actives and in controlling release and bioavailability. Using microfluidics emulsification a team of scientists, led by Dr Tuomas Knowles, have developed new protein microcapsules which have several advantages over existing encapsulation techniques:

  • the capsules are resistant to heat, pH, proteases and physical forces
  • the capsule formation does not use cross linking agents or synthetic polymers
  • capsule morphology and release characteristics can be controlled by adjusting production parameters
  • the capsules are biocompatible and biodegradable
  • the capsules can be formed from all types of protein.
Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Protein microcapsules

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Virtual WDS software

Physical Sciences Ref No: Ree-1001-95
Read more

The Virtual WDS program allows the synthesis of Wavelength-Dispersive Electron Probe Spectra using stored experimental spectra, to facilitate the selection of optimal positions for background measurements and assist in the choice of suitable counting strategies for specific analytical situations.

Further information can be found at the Department of Earth Sciences website and in the following publications:

  • Reed, S. J. B. and Buckley, A. (1996). Virtual WDS. Mikrochim. Acta (Suppl), 13, 479–483
  • Reed, S. J. B. and Buckley, A. (1998). Computer simulation applied to WD analysis. Microscopy and Microanalysis, 4 (Suppl 2), 236–237.

Virtual WDS has been developed to run under Microsoft Windows and will run on either WFW, Windows 95/98, Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows ME or Windows 7. A 16-bit version is still available for WFW but the latest version is 32-bit only (i.e. W95/98/2000/NT/XP/ME).

Licences to the software for both academic and commercial users are available for purchase by contacting us at the link below.

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Virtual WDS software

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Printable inks based on layered nanomaterials

Physical Sciences Ref No: Fer-2710-12
Read more

Professor Andrea Ferrari and his team in the Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge have developed a novel method of producing printable inks based on layered nanomaterials such as graphene. This technology overcomes the issues of current printable inks and can be printed by various methods on flexible substrates.

Printable electronics have to date been limited by the lower electron mobility, and hence operation speed, of organic materials compared to silicon, the production cost, processing requirements and performance of metal or carbon nanoparticle-based inks. Current generation transparent and electrically conductive layers are stiff and brittle and hence limit flexible electronic applications.

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Printable inks based on layered nanomaterials

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Inerter – Suspension Damping Technology

Physical Sciences Ref No: Smi-327-01
Read more

The Inerter is a passive device which allows designers of ride-control and suspension/damping systems the ability to realise performance levels that were previously only possible with actively controlled architectures. The device may be used on its own or in conjunction with traditional ride-control building blocks, to allow the designer cheap and simple, passive access to the full range of suspension characteristics. The device has been licensed by Cambridge Enterprise and is now widely used in motorsport. It promises improvements over traditional technologies in areas such as passenger comfort, heavy vehicles dynamics and the handling of high-performance vehicles. Contact us if you would like to consider using the Inerter in your applications.

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Inerter – Suspension Damping Technology

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.

Gaussian Approximation Potential

Physical Sciences Ref No: Csa-2168-08
Read more

Gaussian Approximation Potential (GAP) is a novel atomistic modelling technique that combines accuracy with speed. By inferring the energy of an atom from the position and identity of its neighbours using a precomputed database of exact quantum mechanical solutions, the potential energy surface of a system of atoms and molecules is approximated.

This methodology allows a controllable compromise to be made between the accuracy of Quantum Chemistry models and the speed of Interatomic Potential methods, with applications in a diverse range of fields including pharmaceuticals, aerospace, electronics and biotechnology.

Download more information

Make an Enquiryread more arrow

Enquiry for Gaussian Approximation Potential

Available Technologies Enquiry

To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.