Available technologies

Licensing Cambridge innovation

Cambridge Enterprise works in collaboration with University of Cambridge researchers to market and license available technologies ranging from the biosciences to engineering.

We have completed more than 1,000 commercial agreements.

We welcome contact from companies interested in licensing available technologies from the University of Cambridge, and work with companies on an individual basis to identify specific areas of interest.

Image: The chromosome screening technology developed by University of Cambridge spin-out BlueGnome has shown to increase in vitro fertilisation (IVF) success rates by 65% over the current methods.

Stapling of Peptides & Proteins to Enhance Therapeutic Potential

Life sciences Ref No: Ber-3373-16
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Dr Goncalo Bernardes and his team from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Cambridge have developed 2 novel stapling methods for peptides & proteins.

These methods have been shown to:

  • Enhance binding affinity of peptides/proteins (& hence have excellent potential to improve efficacy/therapeutic potential)
  • Enhance stability of peptides/proteins

We are seeking a commercial partner for collaboration and/or licensing of this technology which is protected by patent application no. GB1704922.2 filed on 28th March 2017.

For further information (available under CDA), please contact Dr Vibha Tamboli.

Email: vibha.tamboli@enterprise.cam.ac.uk

Phone: +44 (0)1223 760339

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Computational method for rational antibody design

Life sciences Ref No: Ven-2875-13
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Antibodies can usually be obtained against a wide variety of antigens; however, weakly immunogenic epitopes such as membrane proteins, highly conserved proteins and disordered proteins still pose a challenge.

This has particular relevance when developing antibodies against disordered proteins such as αβ peptide, α-synuclein and islet amyloid polypeptide which are associated with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Type 2 diabetes respectively. Using a computational approach a team of scientists led by Professor Michele Vendruscolo of the University of Cambridge, has developed a method which allows the design of antibodies to target specific epitopes within a protein, particularly disordered epitopes. Using this method, antibodies against αβ peptide, α-synuclein and islet amyloid polypeptide have been generated which bind with good specificity and affinity to the target protein. The method can be used to aid the development of therapeutics or probes directed against protein molecules of biomedical or biotechnological interest.

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Computational method to predict the solubility of proteins

Life sciences Ref No: Ven-2792-12
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Using a computational approach a team of scientists, led by Professor Michele Vendruscolo of the University of Cambridge, has developed a neural network method that can predict the solubility of a protein from the amino acid sequence and propose specific amino acid substitutions and/or insertions which will alter the solubility of the protein, while preserving its structure and functionality. The output is a short list of mutational variants with predicted solubility, or aggregation propensity, better than that of the protein provided as input. This method allows rapid screening of tens of thousands of mutations decreasing the time, cost and risk associated with the selection and development of candidate therapeutics and is of particular relevance for the development of therapeutics for high concentration subcutaneous formulations.

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Antibody-free magnetic cell sorting

Life sciences Ref No: Mat-2811-13
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Cell separation technology plays an important role in the fields of microbiology, biotechnology and bioscience, which have wide applications in the pharmaceuticals and healthcare industries. Existing methods suffer disadvantages of time, cost and scalability and, when antibodies are used to bind exogenous cell surface markers for magnetic selection, typically yield cells coated with antibody-antigen complexes and beads. A team from the University of Cambridge has developed a method for antibody-free magnetic cell sorting of transfected or transduced cells that has several advantages:

  • positive selection of ‘untouched’ cells
  • target gene overexpression or knockdown
  • enrichment following CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing
  • no requirement for antibodies
  • no restriction on cell type or species
  • simple, fast and cost-effective.

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Monitoring embryonic vitality

Life sciences Ref No: Zer-2526-10
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Scientists at Cambridge have developed a new method for determining embryo viability for in vitro fertilisation (IVF).

This is a non-invasive and quantitative way of assessing key processes that affect embryo vitality, which could potentially improve the efficiency of IVF by identifying the best embryos to transfer to the mother.

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Polymeric heart valve

Life sciences Ref No: Mog-2514-10
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Scientists at the University of Cambridge have designed and manufactured a tri-leaflet heart valve made of polymers and mimicking for the first time the unique anisotropic properties of natural tissue valves. This polymeric heart valve technology combines the durability of mechanical valves and the haemo-compatibility and flexibility of natural tissue valves to offer new, improved heart valves.

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Programming towards megakaryocytes

Life sciences Ref No: Ped-2635-11
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Cambridge scientists have developed a method to generate platelets in a test-tube from stem cells or iPS cells. These cells provide opportunities for research and clinical application.

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Cell cycle regulation and differentiation

Life sciences Ref No: Val-2729-12
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Scientists have developed a novel approach for directing the differentiation of embryonic stem cells by manipulating the cell cycle. Using cell cycle inhibitors in human pluripotent stem cells, this method gives rise to endoderm cells, which can further be differentiated into pancreatic beta cells or liver cells.

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iPS cells derived from circulatory endothelial progenitors

Life sciences Ref No: Mor-2564-11
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Scientists at the University of Cambridge have designed a new method of generating iPS cells using blood-derived endothelial progenitors as a substrate. This method proves to be far more efficient than traditional methods of iPS cell differentiation, allowing rapid expansion in culture and large scale production.

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Foregut stem cell generation

Life sciences Ref No: Val-2845-13
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Drs Ludovic Vallier and Nicholas Hannan have developed a novel, precisely defined and stepwise method to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells into a multipotent population of foregut stem cells. Not only can this culture system be expanded in 2D culture in the absence of a feeder population or scaffolds and is compliant with large scale production, but the pluripotent cells obtained are truly multipotent and can produce at least three different cell types: lung, pancreas and liver.

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Inducible quiescence for low cost biorefining

Life sciences Ref No: Sum-2913-13
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E.coli is a key production host for chemical feedstocks based on renewable inputs. Achieving acceptable production economics is crucial. Introduction of a patented mutation enables induction of quiescence using indole to drive accumulation of any metabolite of interest rather than unwanted biomass. This process innovation enables biorefining at reduced cost of goods sold.

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Childhood Autism Spectrum Test (CAST)

Life sciences Ref No: Bar-2844-13
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Childhood Autism Spectrum Test (CAST) is a questionnaire developed by Professor Simon Baron-Cohen and colleagues at the Autism Research Centre and available for licensing. Consisting of 37 questions, it aims to identify children aged 4–11 years who are at risk of having Asperger Syndrome (AS) and related social and communication conditions. A suite of tests developed by the team for diagnosing autism is also available for licensing.

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Empathy/Systemizing Quotient (EQ-SQ)

Life sciences Ref No: Bar-2748-12
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Empathy Quotient (EQ), Systemizing Quotient (SQ) and Empathy/Systemizing Quotient (EQ-SQ) are questionnaires developed by Professor Simon Baron-Cohen and colleagues at the Autism Research Centre and available for licensing. They aim to test if adults, adolescents or children of average intelligence have Asperger Syndrome or high functioning autism. A suite of tests developed by the team for diagnosing autism is also available for licensing.

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Quantitative Checklist for Autism in Toddlers

Life sciences Ref No: Bar-2747-12
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The Quantitative Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (Q-CHAT) is a questionnaire developed by Professor Simon Baron-Cohen and colleagues at the Autism Research Centre and available for licensing. Consisting of twenty-five questions, it aims to identify children aged 18-24 months who are at risk of having social-communication disorders. A version with 10 questions is also available. A suite of tests developed by the team for diagnosing autism are also available for licensing.

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Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ)

Life sciences Ref No: Bar-2746-12
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The Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) is a questionnaire developed by Professor Simon Baron-Cohen and colleagues at the Autism Research Centre and available for licensing. Consisting of 50 questions, it aims to test if adults, children or adolescents of average intelligence have symptoms of autism or one of the other autism spectrum conditions. A suite of tests developed by the team for diagnosing autism is also available for licensing.

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Artificial pancreas technology

Life sciences Ref No: Hov-2003-07
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The artificial pancreas technology is a safety mechanism for switching between closed loop and open loop control of glucose levels in Type 1 diabetes patients.

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Generation of origin-specific vascular smooth muscle cells

Life sciences Ref No: Sin-2591-11
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Origin-specific vascular smooth muscle cells were generated from both human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells using chemically defined media. These cells have now been shown to be pure (> 90%), mature and contractile for lineage-specific human cells disease modelling.

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Simulator software

Life sciences Ref No: Hov-2295-09
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Executable and source code to represent glucose regulation of Type 1 diabetes.

 

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Transgenic mice with fluorescently labelled intestinal K-cells

Life sciences Ref No: Gri-2367-09
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This enables exploration of mechanisms involved in glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide secretion with the potential to identify targets in these cells that could be exploited therapeutically for treatment of obesity.

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Transgenic mice with fluorescently labelled proglucagon-expressing cells

Life sciences Ref No: Gri-1716-06
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This enables exploration of mechanisms underlying GLP-1, PYY and glucagon release, with the potential to identify targets in proglucagon-expressing cells that could be exploited therapeutically for the treatment of diabetes and obesity.

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Novel apoptosis imaging agent

Life sciences Ref No: Bri-2121-08
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This is a novel agent for use in molecular imaging of apoptotic cells that can be cross-linked to a variety of contrast agents and is highly suitable for use with imaging technologies such as MRI, PET and SPECT. This imaging agent may be useful as a prognostic indicator of treatment outcome for cancer or cardiac plaque formation.

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Novel controller for navigation of 3D medical imaging data

Life sciences Ref No: Lom-1613-06/Lom-2382-10
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Novel controller for navigation of 3D medical imaging data that enables interactive 2D reformatting of, and navigation through, volumetric imaging data, such as data from CT or MRI, whilst avoiding visual distraction.

For more information see the video or download more information

 

 

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Novel murine model of advanced vulnerable atherosclerosis

Life sciences Ref No: Ben-840-03
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Transgenic mice are engineered so that on induction they rapidly and predictably develop a disease state that shares major features of advanced vulnerable atherosclerosis in humans. This valuable model is highly suited to studies of cardiovascular drugs which stabilise atherosclerotic plaques and the long-term study of arterial diseases such as aneurysm formation, angioplasty restenosis and atherosclerosis.

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