Available technologies

Licensing Cambridge innovation

Cambridge Enterprise works in collaboration with University of Cambridge researchers to market and license available technologies ranging from the biosciences to engineering.

We have completed more than 1,000 commercial agreements.

We welcome contact from companies interested in licensing available technologies from the University of Cambridge, and work with companies on an individual basis to identify specific areas of interest.

Image: The chromosome screening technology developed by University of Cambridge spin-out BlueGnome has shown to increase in vitro fertilisation (IVF) success rates by 65% over the current methods.

Reinforced Bulk Superconductors

Physical Sciences Ref No: Nam-3386-16
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The Bulk Superconductivity Group at the University of Cambridge has been able to address the problems of crack formation, growth and propagation in bulk (RE)BCO superconductors in the presence of large magnetic fields by introducing special reinforcing fibres into the material. The resulting composite materials structure resists internal mechanical forces, and acts as crack stoppers and inhibitors, allowing the material to take increased loads under large magnetic fields. The team is now seeking commercial partners to develop and implement the technology.

Key benefits:

  • Significant improvement in tensile strength, while maintaining superconducting properties
  • Less temperature dependent than complex resin impregnation reinforcement methods
  • Strong, compact (RE)BCO single grains
  • Simple, scalable process

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360° 3D Light-field Display

Physical Sciences Ref No: Yon-3520-17
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Dr Ӧzgür Yöntem and his team in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Cambridge have invented a novel 360° 3D light-field capturing and display system. The display has potential applications in novel gaming experiences, enhanced reality, novel interactive museum experiences, videoconferencing, and autonomous vehicle infotainment.

Key benefits:

  • Display can be viewed by many people from many angles
  • 3D and appears to “pop” out of the surface
  • Compatible with haptic feedback systems
  • Can be used in both capture and display modes
  • Intrinsic capturing property allows real-time hand/eye tracking

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Method to increase in-vitro production of platelets

Life sciences Ref No: Ghe-3579-18
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  • A method using soluble factors able to induce an acute release of platelets from megakaryocytes (MKs) in-vitro prior to harvest.
  • Tested in human cord-derived and iPSC-derived MKs.
  • Increase in platelet number up to 8 folds compared to untreated MKs.

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Method for reducing rendering time and transmission bandwidth for next-generation VR

Physical Sciences Ref No: Man-3441-18
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The advent of wireless VR is pushing the limits of rendering quality and framerate over a more limited cordless connection. By optimising the frame delivery method and rendering time using Temporal Resolution Multiplexing (TRM), VR component manufacturers can bridge the gap between quality and transmission rates required for a truly wireless virtual experience.

By studying the human visual system and its limitations, Dr Rafal Mantiuk and Gyorgy Denes from the Department of Computer Science, University of Cambridge have developed an optimised VR rendering process that minimises rendering time and transmission bandwidth whilst maintaining high visual quality.

 

Benefits

  • Savings on computation, transmission and rendering
  • Blur reduction
  • Improved smoothness of motion
  • Unlocks limits on wireless VR

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Method for single nucleotide resolution mapping of abasic (AP) sites

Life sciences Ref No: Bal-3454-17
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Prof. Sir Shankar Balasubramanian and his team have developed a novel method for single nucleotide resolution mapping of AP sites (including endogenous sites) in genomic DNA. The method uses a novel probe, with selectivity >200 fold relative to 5-fU and >2000 fold relative to 5-fC for use in epigenetics research.

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Human-Sized Tubular Tissue Scaffolds

Life sciences Ref No: Mar-3702-18
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A team from the University of Cambridge has developed a novel method for generating human-size tubular tissue scaffolds, which have the potential to be used as a replacement for a range of diseased or damaged conduits in the human body. The scaffolds are made of biocompatible polymeric hydrogel materials, which support cell/organoid growth, whilst having sufficient mechanical strength for surgical implantation and offering the potential for luminal patterning. The scaffolds have been tested in-vivo. The team is seeking a commercial partner for collaboration and development of this technology.

 

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Enhancing the efficacy and persistence of adoptive T cell therapies

Life sciences Ref No: Joh-3155 & Joh-3733-19
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Apollo Therapeutics, working closely with Prof. Randall Johnson and his team in the Department of Physiology, Development & Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge have developed a small molecule that promotes memory T cell populations – octyl S-2-hydroxyglutarate – and have demonstrated applicability to human CAR-T systems.

 

Licensing opportunity: octyl S-2-hydroxyglutarate

  • Promotes memory T cell populations, conferring persistence and proliferation that translates into enhanced anti-tumour efficacy
  • Characterised in mouse and human systems
  • Fully compatible with human CAR-T lentiviral transduction protocols
  • Opportunity for clinical differentiation

 

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A New Class of Collagen Membranes

Life sciences Ref No: Cam-3575-17
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A new collagen membrane technology has been developed by Professor Ruth Cameron and Professor Serena Best and their team that has the potential to allow for a range of benefits, including:

  • Membranes produced to any size, texture and thickness
  • Curved, shaped, and seamless tubular membranes possible
  • Live cells can be embedded to speed recovery
  • Membranes may be command set in situ to suit the patient

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Highly scattering white cellulose material

Physical Sciences Ref No: Vig-3383-16
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Dr Silvia Vignolini and her team in the Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge and her collaborators at the University of Aalto, have developed a process for producing bright white (highly scattering) films with nano-fibrillated cellulose. This is expected to enable a new generation of pigment-free, biodegradable, white material as a potential replacement for titanium dioxide and zinc oxide.

 

Key Benefits

  • The material is biodegradable, ideal for food colouring and cosmetics
  • Potential replacement for titanium dioxide, which is being phased out
  • Fabricated from a readily available natural material, highly suitable for upscaling
  • Completely opaque at tens of microns thick

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Triboelectric energy harvesting using self-poled Nylon-11 nanowires

Physical Sciences Ref No: Kar-3513-17
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Triboelectric generators are based on the static electric charge created when two dissimilar materials come into contact, and can be used to harvest energy from mechanical vibrations.  Researchers at the Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy have developed a triboelectric generator using self-poled Nylon-11 nanowires. The triboelectric generator provides more efficient energy harvesting than other energy harvesting systems, while matching the power output required by many sensors and devices for wireless sensor networks and wearable electronics.

 

The key benefits of this technology include:

  • A triboelectric generator that can harvest enough energy from ambient mechanical vibrations to power low-power electronic devices
  • Replacement for batteries in applications such as wireless networks and wearable electronics
  • Power output of around 1W/m2 – a ten-fold increase compared to standard triboelectric generators
  • Harvests energy from a wide range of vibrational frequencies (0-10Hz or more)

 

The team is now keen to collaborate with partners to develop applications for this technology.

 

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Enabling smart textiles with fabric-friendly graphene-based inks

Physical Sciences Ref No: Tor-3208-15
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The use of inks incorporating graphene and other 2D materials has been suggested as a way to improve the existing limited approaches to wearable electronics. Poor adhesion of graphene ink to fabric substrates has so far restricted the performance and durability that could be achieved.

Researchers in the Department of Engineering have developed techniques to modify and prepare the substrates, enabling better quality deposition of inks made from graphene and related materials, and resulting in better connectivity and higher performance of the final component. A spin-out company Textile Two Dimensional Ltd is now further improving the technology and is looking for commercial partners interested in adding functionality to their textile product.

In such a new and growing area, the possible applications are extremely varied, but may include

  • fashion (conductive interconnects)
  • functional garments
  • high performance sportswear
  • personal health technology
  • wearable technology / computing
  • automotive (heating elements, sensors)
  • protection (flame retardancy, waterproofing)

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Anaerobic Epoxidation of Ethylene

Physical Sciences Ref No: Mar-3508-17
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Researchers in the Department of Engineering and the Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, have developed a new catalyst and process for the generation of ethylene oxide from ethene which removes the need for purified air, showing a potential new route to more efficient and safer ethylene oxide production. The team is now keen to find suitable partners for upscaling and development.

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High capacitance, low cost, mechanically robust and flexible supercapacitor active material

Physical Sciences Ref No: Smo-3466-17
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Researchers at the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge have developed a new polymeric network material that enables the production of a flexible supercapacitor with high specific capacitance and cycling stability. Possible applications include supercapacitors for wearable and biomedical applications, and soft robotics. The team is now keen to collaborate with suitable partners for the development of the technology.

Key Benefits:

  • High specific capacitance – 182 F/g achieved using PEDOT/PEO polymer network combination
  • High cycling stability – capacitance retained over 3,000 charging cycles at high charge rates, due to the intrinsic mechanical stability of the material
  • Highly flexible and biocompatible – material suitable for wearable and biomedical applications, performance retained over 1,000 bending cycles
  • Wide potential window – working voltage 0 – 2.7 V has been experimentally confirmed for the supercapacitor device based on our active materials
  • Low-cost – uses mature, scalable manufacturing methods (compatible with printing technologies), with cheaply and readily available raw input materials

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Scalable process for manufacturing high-resolution, stretchable electronics

Physical Sciences Ref No: Tan-3350-16
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It is challenging to fabricate electrodes on soft and stretchable substrates such as polymers and elastomers using existing techniques developed for silicon, glass or foil substrates (on which electrodes are more commonly fabricated). This is due to the significantly different chemical and physical properties between these substrates.

These differences generally result in: higher densities of defects, including cracks in the substrate and/or in the electrodes; limited resolutions when using conventional electrode patterning methods; poor adhesion of electrode materials to the substrate; and low surface areas of the electrodes, which can be particularly problematic in the context of biosensors and other wearable or implantable bio-electronic devices.

Researchers at the Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Large-Area Electronics (CIMLAE), University of Cambridge have developed and patented a manufacturing process which address these issues and have produced highly stretchable, high-resolution electronic devices. They are now looking for opportunities to commercially develop and license their technology.

Key Benefits:

  • Intrinsically scalable manufacturing methods
  • Chemical compatibility with common polymers and elastomers
  • Process can be tuned to desired level of stretchability – up to 20% (for total extension of 120%) achieved
  • High-resolution fabrication enabling small, high-sensitivity sensors (down to 50nm features)

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Brief Early Skills & Support Index (BESSI)

Humanities and Social Sciences Ref No: Hug-3300-16
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The Brief Early Skills & Support Index (BESSI) questionnaire has been developed by Prof Claire Hughes and her colleagues at the University of Cambridge and validated for use with reception- and nursery-aged children. The BESSI questionnaire is a promising teacher/nursery staff screening tool that is suitable for children aged 2.5 to 5.5 and provides a broader perspective upon school readiness than previous measures. Current research aims to determine whether the BESSI is appropriate for use in ethnically diverse areas.

A description of the test is listed below:

Hughes, C., Daly, I., Foley, S., White, N., & Devine, R. T. (2015). Brit J Educ Psychol 85, 332-356.

We are happy for teachers, researchers and other professionals working with nursery- and reception-aged children to use the BESSI questionnaire for non-commercial academic research by tertiary educational institutions and would appreciate hearing about this work. Copies of the BESSI questionnaire can be downloaded here along with a coding manual, which provides information about using and scoring the questionnaire, subject to acceptance of the licence terms.

For all other enquiries for use of the BESSI questionnaire, including commercial use or use for the purpose of determining school readiness of children relating to school admittance, please get in touch with us to discuss this further.

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Sharp graphite tips for nanotechnology applications

Physical Sciences Ref No: Fer-3435-17; OM-0406
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Sharp graphite tips have been developed in the lab of Dr Amalio Fernandez-Pacheco at the University of Cambridge using a three-step polishing method. The final diameter of the tips is less than 5 microns, and can be shaped to sub-100 nm sizes and special geometries if the application requires it. These sharp tips have potential uses in various nanotechnology applications such as:

1) Tomographic holders

2) Probes for micromanipulation

3) Semiconducting probes for electrical measurements

4) Probes in organic systems to study their elastic properties

Please contact us if you would like to discuss further.

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A universal formulation strategy for functional inks

Physical Sciences Ref No: Has-3167-15
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A new method for formulating functional inks incorporating a wide range of commercially available nano platelets or nano particles has been demonstrated.

This enables the production of low cost, environmentally friendly, room temperature processable inks, ink additives and composites based on materials such as graphene, MoS2 or h-BN, which in turn can be tailored to achieve enhanced electrical, thermal or physical properties according to the material and application.

Potential applications include:

  • Conductive inks, plastics and adhesives
  • High strength coatings
  • Dielectric or semiconducting inks
  • Thermally conductive composites

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GreenSwirl software for calculating Green’s function for swirling flow in an infinite duct

Physical Sciences Ref No: Mat-3234-15
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GreenSwirl is a MATLAB program for calculating Green’s function for swirling flow in an infinite duct. The duct can have either hard walls or an acoustic lining, modeled using the Ingard-Myers boundary condition. The mean flow is a function of only radial position, can have shear and swirling components, and can be input as functions or data points. The programme calculates eigenmodes and the Green’s function of the linearised Euler equations. The programme calculates these either numerically (Basic version) or numerically and analytically assuming the frequency is large (Advanced version). GreenSwirl has applications to the beamforming technique and can be used in the aeroacoustics industry to model aeroengine noise.

Further information can be found at the GreenSwirl website and in the following publications:

Mathews, J., Peake, N. and Bianchi, S. (May 2016). Asymptotic and numerical Green’s function in a lined duct with realistic shear and swirl. 22nd AIAA/CEAS Conference Paper (Lyon).

Mathews, J., and Peake. N., Journal of Sound and Vibration, Journal of Sound and Vibration, 2017, 395, 294-316.

Licences to the software for both academic and commercial users are available for purchase by contacting us at the link below.

Image result for aircraft pictures

 

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Q3PULSE software for predicting unsteady turbocharger turbine performance

Physical Sciences Ref No: Cao-3214-15
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The Q3PULSE software is used for predicting unsteady turbocharger turbine performance, particularly under pulsating flow conditions. It builds a low order model of a turbine which combines a quasi-3D model for a volute and multiple meanline models for a rotor. This model strikes a good balance between accuracy and complexity. It provides a quick, robust and accurate prediction of unsteady turbine performance under pulsating flows. It is therefore a good research and design tool which allows turbine designers to accommodate the pulsating flow effect into the preliminary turbine design.

The software is compatible with Linux and Windows. Academic and commercial licensing is available; please get in contact for more information.

Q3PULSE Fig1          Q3PULSE Fig2

Publications:

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 2016, 138(7), 072607.

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Highly Rechargeable and Efficient Lithium-Air Battery

Physical Sciences Ref No: Gre-3148-15
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Professor Clare Grey and her team at the Department of Chemistry have developed a novel technology for aprotic Lithium-Air (Li-Air) batteries. This ground-breaking technology uses a spongy graphene cathode and new chemistry based on the formation of LiOH. The resulting battery exhibits extremely low over-potential (<0.2 V), leading to efficiency greater than 90% and fewer side-reactions. The battery can be charged and recharged for more than 1000 cycles. The battery is also stable with respect to moisture.

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COBRAS Concrete Bridge Assessment Program

Software Ref No: Mid-1022-96
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Concrete Bridge Assessment Program (COBRAS) is a yield-line analysis software program for assessing the ultimate load capacity of concrete structures, and in particular, concrete bridge decks.

A number of UK bridge authorities, consultants and overseas organisations are currently using the program to evaluate the load carrying capacity of concrete bridges that have failed assessment using conventional elastic analysis methods. The program has been developed in the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge by Dr Campbell Middleton and colleagues. The team have received support from various bodies including the Highways Agency, Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

A paper by Dr Campbell Middleton presented at the Surveyor Bridge Conference in London, March 1998 gives more information on the program and its use for concrete bridge assessment.

Further information can be found at the COBRAS website.

Licences to the software for both academic and commercial users are available for purchase by contacting us at the link below.

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Computational method to predict the solubility of proteins

Software Ref No: Ven-2792-12
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Using a computational approach a team of scientists, led by Professor Michele Vendruscolo of the University of Cambridge, has developed a neural network method that can predict the solubility of a protein from the amino acid sequence and propose specific amino acid substitutions and/or insertions which will alter the solubility of the protein, while preserving its structure and functionality. The output is a short list of mutational variants with predicted solubility, or aggregation propensity, better than that of the protein provided as input. This method allows rapid screening of tens of thousands of mutations decreasing the time, cost and risk associated with the selection and development of candidate therapeutics and is of particular relevance for the development of therapeutics for high concentration subcutaneous formulations.

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Protein microcapsules

Physical Sciences Ref No: Kno-2950-13
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A method of forming nanofibrillar protein microcapsules has been developed at the University of Cambridge. Encapsulation technologies can be used as delivery systems for a variety of applications in beauty, personal care, food and healthcare. Encapsulation provides a means of targeting delivery, protecting unstable actives from degradation, formulating incompatible actives and in controlling release and bioavailability. Using microfluidics emulsification a team of scientists, led by Dr Tuomas Knowles, have developed new protein microcapsules which have several advantages over existing encapsulation techniques:

  • the capsules are resistant to heat, pH, proteases and physical forces
  • the capsule formation does not use cross linking agents or synthetic polymers
  • capsule morphology and release characteristics can be controlled by adjusting production parameters
  • the capsules are biocompatible and biodegradable
  • the capsules can be formed from all types of protein.
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Polymeric heart valve

Life sciences Ref No: Mog-2514-10
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Scientists at the University of Cambridge have designed and manufactured a tri-leaflet heart valve made of polymers and mimicking for the first time the unique anisotropic properties of natural tissue valves. This polymeric heart valve technology combines the durability of mechanical valves and the haemo-compatibility and flexibility of natural tissue valves to offer new, improved heart valves.

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To find out more about how this website collects your personal data see www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk/about-us/information-compliance/data-protection/core-privacy-notices/website-users-use-personal-information/
  • In submitting your personal data via this form, you consent to being contacted via the details provided so that your enquiry can be responded to. A backup of your data will be held but only authorised individuals will be able to access your data. If you would like your data to be removed, please email support@thewebkitchen.co.uk.